UG Alumni

“UG Alumni” are those who spend at least 6 months in the lab, typically working on their final year undergraduate/masters thesis.

UG-Alum 2016-17

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Kushal Appilineni did his final year Physics project with our lab. He worked with PhD students Sabiha Majumder and Sumithra Sankaran on analytically solving a 1-dimensional model of vegetation dynamics with positive feedbacks. He loves studying and solving problems arising in the intersection of physics and other fields like biology, atmospheric sciences, economics etc. I find it quite fascinating how complex systems in these contrasting disciplines work on very similar underlying principles. He also plays and composes music, “expressing different experiences in life through it.”

Publication: Sabiha Majumder, Sumithra Sankaran, Kushal Appilineni, Vishwesha Guttal, Demographic noise and multistability in contact process model, In Preparation

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Aakash Sengupta joined our lab for the second year project of his Int Ph.D course and worked on collective animal behaviour. He completed his MS thesis on “Transitions in Collective Behavioural States in Animal Groups” in Dec 2016.

 

UG-Alum 2015-16

TapanTapan Goel completed his undergraduate at IISc majoring in physics with a minor in Biology. He did his final year project on analysing schooling dynamics of fish.

After completing his project at our lab, Tapan joined QBio PhD program UCSD, USA.

 

UG Alumni 2014-15

amitabhAmitabh Shrivastava a physics major, biology minor from the first batch of IISc UG students. Amitabh has developed some really cool engineering tools towards conservation and ecological research. In his final year project, he developed a hexacopter, a fixed wing UAV and an elephant height sensor — all in less than an year. After his UG from IISc, his engineering geekiness landed him in a start-up that makes cool physics toys. He is currently (2017-19) a Masters student at NYU Interactive Telecommunications Program.

Athmanatathmahan Senthilnathan did his UG majoring in Mathematics at IISc.  For his final year project, he worked on developing a merge-split model for mixed species flocking systems, coadvised by Srikanth Iyer from Mathematics Department. After completing his UG degree, in Aug 2015, he moved to the Department of ecology and evolutionary biology at University of Tennessee, USA.

Publication: Gokual Nair, Athmanathan Senthilnathan, Srikanth Iyer, Vishwesha Guttal, Fission-fusion dynamics and group-size dependent composition in heterogeneous populations, arXiv:1711.06882 [nlin.AO]

Nikunj Goel did his UG at IISc majoring in Physics. His final year project focussed on study of early warning signals, developed in the ecology literature, of financial crashes which resulted in a publication and how to predict tipping points using concepts from information theory. After his UG degree, he joined the PhD program at Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology at Yale University and continues an active collaboration with our lab.

Publication: Vishwesha Guttal*, Srinivas Raghavendran*, Nikunj Goel*, and Quentin Hoarau. 2016, Lack of Critical Slowing Down Suggests that Financial Meltdowns Are Not Critical Transitions, yet Rising Variability Could Signal Systemic Risk,  PLoS ONE, 11(1): e0144198. (*Equal contribution)

Highlights: This publication was covered by Natura Asia with an article titled “Ecological science theory analyses stock market crashes”

visweswaranVisweswaran Ravikumar majored in Biology with a minor in physics from IISc.  He worked on biofilm experiments (with Prof Dipshikha Chakraborty in MCBL) and modelling vegetation patterns. After getting his UG degree from IISc, he moved to University of Texas for a second Masters program.

Quentin Hoarau, a student from France, from Oct 2014 to Feb 2015, worked on analyzing financial data and built various simple stochastic process based models, which resulted in a publication. 

Publication: Vishwesha Guttal*, Srinivas Raghavendran*, Nikunj Goel*, and Quentin Hoarau. 2016, Lack of Critical Slowing Down Suggests that Financial Meltdowns Are Not Critical Transitions, yet Rising Variability Could Signal Systemic Risk,  PLoS ONE, 11(1): e0144198. (*Equal contribution)

Highlights: This publication was covered by Natura Asia with an article titled “Ecological science theory analyses stock market crashes”

2014 or earlier:

Pradeeksha Shetty (MSc from Bangalore University) worked with us for her MSc project for about 6 months from Jan-June 2014 on phylogeny of fish and relating it to their social behaviour.

Sravya Karur, did her B.Tech project from Dec 2012-April 2013 working to develop a model of Salmonella pathogenesis. She then joined TCS as software trainee.

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