Research project position for a duration of 5-6 months in the departments of Chemical engineering and CES

Applications are invited for a research project position for a duration of 5-6 months in the departments of Chemical engineering and Centre for ecology, IISc Bangalore, India (Deadline for application: 06 Nov 2018). 

Broad research area: Understanding the agent-level interactions that give rise to the observed collective behaviour.

Project details: Project will be computational in nature; Project will involve developing optimization based methods to identify underlying interactions between a group of agents (like a school of fish or traffic) from the data of their motion and collective dynamics

About the project supervisor:

Dr Danny Raj M, INSPIRE faculty, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, IISc [dannym@iisc.ac.in– contact]

Website (for more details): http://dannyrajm.wixsite.com/danny-raj-m

The work will be done in collaboration with Dr Vishwesha Guttal, Associate Professor, Centre for ecological sciences, IISc Bangalore.https://teelabiisc.wordpress.com

Eligibility: Bachelor’s or Master’s degree from Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Biological sciences; Final year projects for students in a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree

Skills desirable: Comfortable with building algorithms and coding (preferably in MATLAB; other packages like Python, Mathematica are also welcome); Penchant for analysing and understanding non-linear dynamics of systems

Details of salary: Candidates joining as project assistant or associate would get a salary commensurate of their experience and qualification; Candidates applying here for their final year projects are not eligible for a salary

Deadline for application: 06 Nov 2018

Contact: Interested candidates should email their resume to dannym@iisc.ac.in with the subject RESEARCH PROJECT POSITION- REG, stating why they are interested in the project (in brief) and how long they can commit to it. [The resume should detail any projects or interesting ventures undertaken that would be relevant for the post being offered].

Other details: An interview or test, will be held with the interested candidate following which the decision to offer the position will be made. The position is extendable based on the performance of the individual.


New paper by Jaideep Joshi: Demographic noise and cost of greenbeard can facilitate greenbeard cooperation

We are delighted to announce a new paper from the lab!

Jaideep Joshi and Vishwesha Guttal, 2018, Demographic noise and cost of greenbeard can facilitate greenbeard cooperation, Evolution, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13615

This is the second paper of our former PhD student Jaideep Joshi. Fantastic work, involving some hard-core analytical and simulational work to address an interesting problem on the evolution of greenbeard cooperation.

Congratulations to Jaideep!

While you are here, you must also check the previous paper of Jaideep on how mobility promotes cooperation, published last year in Plos Computational Biology.

 


Advise: On requesting recommendation letters

Many students ask me to write recommendation letters for a variety of purposes, like internship abroad, summer school and most importantly – graduate schools. It’s an important part of our job as academics to encourage younger and aspiring students. Therefore, in general, I am happy to write supporting letters if I know you ‘sufficiently well’. Here are some general tips to follow when you request me (or more generally it may apply to others whom you approach) to send recommendation letters – this information will help me to write better-supporting letters.

  • First, do write a short note requesting if the person you think is suitable to write a letter is willing to do so. When you do so, state the purpose of your application, attach your cv and mention the deadline.
  • In general, write at least a few weeks ahead of the deadline and clearly state what is the deadline. If the deadline is very short – you can still write, but be aware that many mentors may decline even if they feel you are a fantastic candidate.

Once I have agreed to send you the letter:

  • If it’s a graduate school application season, send a list of university, department, their respective deadlines, the program (PhD vs Masters), etc all in a single email.
  • Do send an updated CV every time you ask for a letter – even if I had sent a letter last year for a similar purpose. I would like to know how your cv has improved since last time, so that any modifications to the letter can be done.
  • Provide as much information on what is the recommendation for? And any other relevant information about the application. For example, if you wrote a proposal or statement of interest that is not confidential – share it with me. Share any pdf/link to details of what the application is asking. Sometimes, some advertisements are aimed for specific candidates with certain background (for ex: this conf is aimed for physicists interested in biology, or vice versa). Do point out them to me. A generic letter won’t help the selection to committee decide whether you are suitable.
  • A short note on any specific points that you would like me to highlight about you. It could be about your project/work done with me, about your grades, a new publication/work of yours that I am unaware of, or anything that you think will help your application. If you are applying to unusual programs (e.g. Masters in conservation biology but your background is in mathematics), tell me reasons for the same. Such information is very important and useful for me to write a good supporting letter.
  • Do not hesitate to remind me whether I have submitted the letter. Check the status at least a week, and a few days before, the deadline.

 

Finally, let me know the outcome of your application because I am curious to know, and am also interested in making sure you succeed. Moreover, its a basic courtesy to inform the outcome (even if its negative) to someone has invested time in writing a letter of recommendation. A negative outcome may also help your referee to improve the letter the next time you ask him/her.


Hari Sridhar’s recent paper on Mixed-species flocks covered in Indian Express

Amitabh Sinha at Indian Express has a nice summary of Hari Sridhar’s recently published paper on “Friendship across species borders: factors that facilitate and constrain heterospecific sociality”.

Click here for the Indian Express article with the nice title: “Costs and benefits: Why birds of a feather sometimes don’t flock together”. This is how it looks in the newspaper!

Sridhar-Guttal-Indian_express-Coverage

Click here for the original research article.

 

 


We have been awarded an UGC-UKIERI grant for collaboration with Colin Torney

We are delighted that we have been awarded an UGC-UKIERI grant for collaboration with Colin Torney in the School of Mathematics and Statistics, University of Glasgow and my colleague Dr Kavita Isvaran at CES. The grant amount is around 25,000 UK Pounds (equivalent to around 25 lakhs) and is valid from March 2018 – March 2020.

The ideas and work proposed here are by PhD student Akanksha Rathore who is jointly advised by me and Kavita. The grant will help both of our groups to travel back and forth, and work on investigating collective behaviour of blackbuck in the wild.

This is our second collaborative grant with Colin Torney, the previous one being funded by Royal Society which was instrumental in starting our collaboration as well as getting this grant.

 

 

 


Congratulations to Sabiha Majumder and Jaideep Joshi for their successful completion of PhD!!!

2018 has been a fantastic year for our lab.

HUGE congratulations to two lab members (now, unfortunately, former lab members) — Sabiha Majumder and Jaideep Joshi – for the successfully defending their thesis.

Sabiha Majumder

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Sabiha Majumder defended her thesis on 26th February 2018. She joined IISc as an Integrated PhD student in the Department of Physics. Her Physics adviser was Prof Sriram Ramaswamy and with us she worked on “Multiple stable states and abrupt transitions in ecosystems”. She made some extremely important contributions to our understanding on patterns and dynamics ecosystems with multiple stable states, whether we can anticipate them via measuring simple quantities from field data, and whether we can even estimate threshold/critical points of such ecosystems.

Sabiha has joined as a postdoctoral fellow at Crowther Lab at ETH-Zurich. All the best for her future work. She will be badly missed in our lab.

Jaideep Joshi

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Jaideep defended his thesis on 30th January 2018. He joined IISc as a PhD student at CES and worked on some deeply insightly theoretical aspects of the evolution of cooperation in spatial systems. Apart from working with me, he also established his own collaborations as part of his thesis. After his PhD, he has joined as a postdoctoral researcher at Divecha Centre for Climate Change, IISc with prof Sukumar of CES. All the best to Jaideep for his future endeavours!


New paper: Jaideep Joshi’s paper on mobility and cooperation

We have a bunch of papers from the lab that I haven’t time to announce on the website (but I do active tweet about them!). Here, I briefly post about the first thesis chapter of Jaideep Joshi is now published in Plos Computational Biology. It’s a really cool theory paper on mobility can actually promote cooperation.

Active-Passive-CollBeh-Simulations

(The above picture is from Figure 1 of the manuscript Joshi et al 2017, Mobility can promote the evolution of cooperation via emergent self-assortment dynamics, PLoS Computational Biology, 13(9): e1005732).

The way we set up the problem is that can we have cooperation in mobile organisms if we exclude well known mechanisms that facilitate the evolution of cooperation. Yes, indeed, we can find cooperation via emergent assortment of cooperators. This paper shows this counter-intuitive using heavy simulations of active or self-propelled particles, simulations of passive particles in turbulent media, and an analytical theory. All of it packed into a single paper.

Here is a nice summary of this work written by Ananya from Research Matters, a popular science communication webpage:

Classically, it has been argued that cooperative interactions evolve mostly among genetic relatives or individuals in close-knit environments – like the lions or the buffaloes. There is also the factor that these animals are mobile and often split and merge depending on the availability of food. What, then, could be the motivation for cooperative interactions to emerge among such dynamic groups that are not genetically related?

“Much of the earlier research on cooperation thought that mobility was a hindrance to the evolution of cooperation. This is because mobility allows defectors to invade and destroy clusters of co-operators, which are necessary for cooperation to sustain”, says Mr. Joshi. In their study, published in the journal PLOS Computational Biology, the researchers have considered two scenarios for mobility – one, where the individuals move through self-propulsion such as fishes and birds, and second, where the individuals move due to the flow of the medium they live in such as microbes.

The study demonstrates that, rather than hinder it, mobility can help animals evolve cooperation to form groups even among unknown individuals without any kinship. “Our study is like a thought-experiment, but aided by sophisticated theoretical and computational tools. However, our model can easily be adapted to real systems by incorporating features specific to those systems. These could include cancer cells, quorum sensing bacteria, mixed species bird flocks, or even grouping mammals such as spotted deer, baboons and elephants”, signs off Dr. Joshi.