Research project position for a duration of 5-6 months in the departments of Chemical engineering and CES

Applications are invited for a research project position for a duration of 5-6 months in the departments of Chemical engineering and Centre for ecology, IISc Bangalore, India (Deadline for application: 06 Nov 2018). 

Broad research area: Understanding the agent-level interactions that give rise to the observed collective behaviour.

Project details: Project will be computational in nature; Project will involve developing optimization based methods to identify underlying interactions between a group of agents (like a school of fish or traffic) from the data of their motion and collective dynamics

About the project supervisor:

Dr Danny Raj M, INSPIRE faculty, Dept. of Chemical Engineering, IISc [dannym@iisc.ac.in– contact]

Website (for more details): http://dannyrajm.wixsite.com/danny-raj-m

The work will be done in collaboration with Dr Vishwesha Guttal, Associate Professor, Centre for ecological sciences, IISc Bangalore.https://teelabiisc.wordpress.com

Eligibility: Bachelor’s or Master’s degree from Engineering, Physics, Mathematics, Biological sciences; Final year projects for students in a Bachelor’s or Master’s degree

Skills desirable: Comfortable with building algorithms and coding (preferably in MATLAB; other packages like Python, Mathematica are also welcome); Penchant for analysing and understanding non-linear dynamics of systems

Details of salary: Candidates joining as project assistant or associate would get a salary commensurate of their experience and qualification; Candidates applying here for their final year projects are not eligible for a salary

Deadline for application: 06 Nov 2018

Contact: Interested candidates should email their resume to dannym@iisc.ac.in with the subject RESEARCH PROJECT POSITION- REG, stating why they are interested in the project (in brief) and how long they can commit to it. [The resume should detail any projects or interesting ventures undertaken that would be relevant for the post being offered].

Other details: An interview or test, will be held with the interested candidate following which the decision to offer the position will be made. The position is extendable based on the performance of the individual.


New paper by Jaideep Joshi: Demographic noise and cost of greenbeard can facilitate greenbeard cooperation

We are delighted to announce a new paper from the lab!

Jaideep Joshi and Vishwesha Guttal, 2018, Demographic noise and cost of greenbeard can facilitate greenbeard cooperation, Evolution, DOI: https://doi.org/10.1111/evo.13615

This is the second paper of our former PhD student Jaideep Joshi. Fantastic work, involving some hard-core analytical and simulational work to address an interesting problem on the evolution of greenbeard cooperation.

Congratulations to Jaideep!

While you are here, you must also check the previous paper of Jaideep on how mobility promotes cooperation, published last year in Plos Computational Biology.

 


Advise: On requesting recommendation letters

Many students ask me to write recommendation letters for a variety of purposes, like internship abroad, summer school and most importantly – graduate schools. It’s an important part of our job as academics to encourage younger and aspiring students. Therefore, in general, I am happy to write supporting letters if I know you ‘sufficiently well’. Here are some general tips to follow when you request me (or more generally it may apply to others whom you approach) to send recommendation letters – this information will help me to write better-supporting letters.

  • First, do write a short note requesting if the person you think is suitable to write a letter is willing to do so. When you do so, state the purpose of your application, attach your cv and mention the deadline.
  • In general, write at least a few weeks ahead of the deadline and clearly state what is the deadline. If the deadline is very short – you can still write, but be aware that many mentors may decline even if they feel you are a fantastic candidate.

Once I have agreed to send you the letter:

  • If it’s a graduate school application season, send a list of university, department, their respective deadlines, the program (PhD vs Masters), etc all in a single email.
  • Do send an updated CV every time you ask for a letter – even if I had sent a letter last year for a similar purpose. I would like to know how your cv has improved since last time, so that any modifications to the letter can be done.
  • Provide as much information on what is the recommendation for? And any other relevant information about the application. For example, if you wrote a proposal or statement of interest that is not confidential – share it with me. Share any pdf/link to details of what the application is asking. Sometimes, some advertisements are aimed for specific candidates with certain background (for ex: this conf is aimed for physicists interested in biology, or vice versa). Do point out them to me. A generic letter won’t help the selection to committee decide whether you are suitable.
  • A short note on any specific points that you would like me to highlight about you. It could be about your project/work done with me, about your grades, a new publication/work of yours that I am unaware of, or anything that you think will help your application. If you are applying to unusual programs (e.g. Masters in conservation biology but your background is in mathematics), tell me reasons for the same. Such information is very important and useful for me to write a good supporting letter.
  • Do not hesitate to remind me whether I have submitted the letter. Check the status at least a week, and a few days before, the deadline.

 

Finally, let me know the outcome of your application because I am curious to know, and am also interested in making sure you succeed. Moreover, its a basic courtesy to inform the outcome (even if its negative) to someone has invested time in writing a letter of recommendation. A negative outcome may also help your referee to improve the letter the next time you ask him/her.


Teaching a Statistics course

This semester, I will be venturing into teaching statistics course along with my colleague Prof Kavita Isvaran. This is going to be quite exciting because I have only taught mathematical ecology (and its variants, basic to intermediate to advanced) so far.

Of course, Kavita has been teaching this course on Quantitative ecology, with a focus on both research design and statistical inference, for almost a decade. This course has undoubtedly transformed the quantitative skills of our students and they way they design and analyse their PhD thesis projects.

This year, the main change to the course is as follows: we will cover less material but will add depth (the breadth will be added in a second course in Jan 2019). While Kavita will teach Research design in the first half of the course, I will teach basic statistics – starting from probability distributions to point estimations and linear regression – in the second half of the course. We really want to ensure people understand basics of what they are doing – including associated math and programming.

We will be assisted by our joint PhD student Aakanksha to conduct tutorials in math, R, grading assignments, etc.


Hari Sridhar’s recent paper on Mixed-species flocks covered in Indian Express

Amitabh Sinha at Indian Express has a nice summary of Hari Sridhar’s recently published paper on “Friendship across species borders: factors that facilitate and constrain heterospecific sociality”.

Click here for the Indian Express article with the nice title: “Costs and benefits: Why birds of a feather sometimes don’t flock together”. This is how it looks in the newspaper!

Sridhar-Guttal-Indian_express-Coverage

Click here for the original research article.

 

 


(New) Paper on dryland ecosystem transitions and coverage in Deccan herald

Although I have tweeted quite a bit about this paper, I have been rather slow to announce this paper on this blog.

Chen Ning, Kailiang Yu, C Jayaprakash, Vishwesha Guttal, 2018, Rising variability, not slowing down, as a leading indicator of a stochastically driven abrupt transition in a dryland ecosystem, The American Naturalist, 191: E1 E14Data and Codes via Dryad. 

In this paper, we conduct an empirical test of early warning signals in a dryland ecosystem in China. This was based on a very cool email-collaboration with Chen Ning, a graduate student at that time.

The empirical analyses closely match with results of one of my PhD thesis paper with Prof C Jayaprakash, who is also a coauthor on this paper.

Suma from Gubbi Labs wrote this really nice popular article for Research Matters and it was also picked up by Deccan Herald, a very prominent English newspaper in South India !!!!